The magazine that pioneered and popularized mainstream nudity is making the drastic change of eliminating nude photos from its publication in its upcoming redesign.

In a move that sounds like Papa John's no longer serving pizza, the iconic magazine will be going through another redesign in March 2016, this time eliminating what its been known for since its inception: nudity. While the magazine will still feature pictorials of beautiful women, they will no longer be nude in the pictures.

Executives at Playboy feel they've become victims of their own revolution, taking sex from a taboo social topic to just one click away. With 24/7 connectivity to the internet, the commercial value and cultural relevance of the once mighty social icon has taken a major hit.

According to CEO Scott Flanders, the company has already altered a great deal of its content to be safe for work as to not harm its social media presence. Last August, the company removed nudity from its website and saw their hits per month quadruple from 4 million to 16 million, and the age of the average visitor drop from 47 to around 30-years-old.

Playboy magazine has seen a definite decline over the past several years, with rumors that Hugh Hefner was considering selling off the company. Average circulation of the magazine went from over five million in the 70s to under one million today, with its best-selling issue, November 1972, selling over seven million copies.

Chief Content Editor Cory Jones said that the magazine will carry a PG-13 feel to its pictures, calling them, "A little more accessible, a little more intimate." Jones also noted that while they will still feature a Playmate of the Month, they have not yet decided if the centerfold will remain after the redesign.

Playboy's chief competition, Penthouse magazine, responded to the change in the virtual pornography market in the opposite direction as Playboy, adopting an even more explicit sexual nature. However, the company didn't survive the change and filed for bankruptcy in 2013.

via The NY Times