The NCAA is planning on playing a tournament in the state over the next decade, but they could end it if this new bill passes.

Up in Oklahoma a new bill is being proposed which is being called The ‘Save Women’s Sports Act’. The bill would prevent transgender athletes from playing on girl’s or women’s teams at public schools. The NCAA has released a statement on the proposed bill saying they do not support it. Their full statement is below:

“The NCAA Board of Governors firmly and unequivocally supports the opportunity for transgender student-athletes to compete in college sports. This commitment is grounded in our values of inclusion and fair competition.

The NCAA has a long-standing policy that provides a more inclusive path for transgender participation in college sports. Our approach — which requires testosterone suppression treatment for transgender women to compete in women’s sports — embraces the evolving science on this issue and is anchored in participation policies of both the International Olympic Committee and the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee. Inclusion and fairness can coexist for all student-athletes, including transgender athletes, at all levels of sport. Our clear expectation as the Association’s top governing body is that all student-athletes will be treated with dignity and respect. We are committed to ensuring that NCAA championships are open for all who earn the right to compete in them.

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When determining where championships are held, NCAA policy directs that only locations where hosts can commit to providing an environment that is safe, healthy and free of discrimination should be selected. We will continue to closely monitor these situations to determine whether NCAA championships can be conducted in ways that are welcoming and respectful of all participants.”

That last paragraph is where things could get interesting for Oklahoma if this bill passes. As of right now, the NCAA is committed to hosting the Women's College World Series in Oklahoma City through 2035. We will see what happens, as with all politics, this has a long way to go before being signed.

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