It’s called the Great American Eclipse and it crosses the continental United States from Oregon to South Carolina on Monday, August 21st. While Wichita Falls won’t be in the 100% obscuration area, we will see a marked decrease in daylight in the early afternoon hours with about 77% of the sun’s light blocked by the moon.

When it comes to things in the sky, the first people we like to talk to are meteorologists, and while solar eclipses aren’t exactly their field, they are usually a pretty good source of information. With that in mind, we sat down with meteorologist John Cameron from KAUZ, News Channel 6, and asked him a few questions about what we can expect from the total solar eclipse here in the Texoma area and how and when to view it.

Curious about exactly how much obscuration your friends in other cities will see? Just click on their location on this handy eclipse calculator from those smart people at NASA.

Enjoy the eclipse, and remember, never look directly into the sun without solar eclipse approved sunglasses. If you have them, you might want to keep them in a safe place, there’s another eclipse coming in 2024 and we’ll be much closer to the total eclipse path that time around!