Here we go again. 

As millions of Americans hit the road for Spring Break, the Director of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says we may be in for another COVID-19 wave. 

Even though vaccinations have been rolling out a rapid pace and infections are declining, the United States is still seeing a dangerously high baseline number of cases that could result in a spike in cases if people let their guard down, according to CNBC.

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CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky had this to say in a press briefing on Monday: 

With the coming warmer weather, I know it’s tempting to want to relax and to let our guard down, particularly after a hard winter that sadly saw the highest level of cases and deaths during the pandemic so far... I’m pleading with you, for the sake of our nation’s health. Cases climbed last spring, they climbed again in the summer, they will climb now if we stop taking precautions when we continue to get more and more people vaccinated.

While air travel is nowhere near 2019 levels, there have been over 1 million TSA screenings per day since last Thursday. That’s the most we’ve seen in over a year. The CDC has advised that air travel be limited to essential trips only, even for those who have been fully vaccinated. 

It will be interesting to see what happens in the coming months. Yes, the number of cases is dropping dramatically every day, but after the unpredictable events of the past year, I’ll remain cautiously optimistic.

LOOK: Answers to 30 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

While much is still unknown about the coronavirus and the future, what is known is that the currently available vaccines have gone through all three trial phases and are safe and effective. It will be necessary for as many Americans as possible to be vaccinated in order to finally return to some level of pre-pandemic normalcy, and hopefully these 30 answers provided here will help readers get vaccinated as soon they are able.

READ ON: See the States Where People Live the Longest

Stacker used data from the 2020 County Health Rankings to rank every state's average life expectancy from lowest to highest. The 2020 County Health Rankings values were calculated using mortality counts from the 2016-2018 National Center for Health Statistics. The U.S. Census 2019 American Community Survey and America's Health Rankings Senior Report 2019 data were also used to provide demographics on the senior population of each state and the state's rank on senior health care, respectively.

Read on to learn the average life expectancy in each state.